By Steve Adubato, PhD

A powerful lesson in leadership: take responsibility for your actions as well as your words… especially when things go wrong.

By Steve Adubato, PhD

One of the things I’ve learned after two decades of writing, teaching and talking about leadership is that some of the best lessons can come from the most unlikely sources. When people talk about great leaders, they often reference corporate giants, historical political figures or the Vince Lombardi’s of the sports world.

By Steve Adubato, PhD

As leaders, we’ve all had these thoughts before:

“Why can’t that executive just stop being so argumentative?”

“I wish the stakeholders would see my point of view on that merger.”

By Steve Adubato, PhD

I was coaching a client recently who told me that in her performance evaluation, the manager she reported to told her she needed to be “more assertive” in her leadership style. Interestingly, just a few weeks ago in a communication and leadership skills seminar, one of the participants shared his concern that one of his managers was “too aggressive” in his leadership and that he wanted this manager to tone it down a bit.

by Steve Adubato, PhD

By most accounts, Abraham Lincoln was one of the great presidents in American history. While the movie "Lincoln," released in 2012, got significant praise, I especially enjoyed reading Pulitzer Prize-winning author Doris Kearns Goodwin’s book "Team of Rivals," one of the most comprehensive books about Lincoln and his extraordinary leadership ability.

by Steve Adubato, PhD

Mario Cuomo was a giant in American politics. He was an extraordinary public orator who moved millions to tears with his words, passion and iron-willed convictions. Those communication skills also made him a leader in the eyes of many. I was honored to have the opportunity to interview him in 2002 for public broadcasting. I sat with Governor Cuomo at the New Jersey Performing Arts a Center in Newark where he had come to deliver a speech.