by Steve Adubato, PhD

Just when I thought Donald Trump couldn’t get any worse in his public speeches, he hit a new low in Rochester, NH (after bragging that he did so well in the CNN GOP Republican debate) in which he clearly did not step up and act like a leader. Trump’s first question from the audience came from a supporter who asked, “We have a problem in this country. It's called Muslims. You know our current President is one. You know he's not even an American… Anyway, we have training camps growing where they want to kill us. That's my question: When can we get rid of them?"

by Steve Adubato, PhD

Much of Hillary Clinton’s problem right now is a product of her own doing. If she were a stronger leader, with a greater sense of integrity and honesty, she would have dealt with this email controversy in a very different way. Instead of saying that storing thousands of emails on a private server – potentially, many sensitive emails – as Secretary of State was “allowed,” what she should have simply done from the beginning was say something like this; “I was wrong. It doesn’t matter what the law allows, what I did was inappropriate. I should have gone to the government email server given my role as Secretary of State. It created the wrong impression about my intent regarding those emails and I am fully responsible for that problem. I need to deal with this immediately by turning over those emails and fully cooperating with all of the agencies investigating this situation. It was a mistake and I need to do better in the future.”

by Steve Adubato, PhD

In any organization, the quality of meetings directly impacts productivity, effectiveness and employee engagement and happiness. Think about it. If your organization requires that you attend countless meetings that you find boring – and not especially relevant to you and your work – how engaged would you be? Yet, too often poorly run meetings become part of an organization’s normal course of business. I often hear, “It’s just the way we do things” as the explanation but I don’t buy it.

by Steve Adubato, PhD

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, I can’t figure out the Donald Trump thing. I can’t figure out his appeal to so many voters and I’m amazed that the masses haven’t figured out how full of it he really is. Not only isn’t he a legitimate leader – by any reasonable standard of defining what a leader is – he’s the king of insults. Donald Trump is like the Don Rickles of presidential politics. He insults just about everyone. Except Rickles is funny, Trump is just mean. As Peter Wehner, a senior White House advisor to George W. Bush, recently said, “He shouldn’t be let near a Twitter account, let alone nuclear weapons.”

By Steve Adubato, PhD

Very often, as leaders we talk about how WE see the world – our vision, our strategy, our plans. It’s critical to have a distinct vision and to clearly communicate it to the people we will be asking to help us get there. However, a truly well-rounded leader must also have the ability – and a burning desire – to empathize and care about those they are trying to lead and serve. This includes our audience and our stakeholders, those on our team, our peers, and our clients or customers. Simply put, we need to empathize with those who help us achieve what we need to get done every day and allow us to get credit when things go right (and yes, if you are a really good leader, take responsibility when things go wrong).

By Steve Adubato, PhD

A lot happened in last night’s Fox News ‪GOP Debate, but for me two huge leadership issues played out and both were hard to watch on every level. The first was when Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly simply asked leading GOP candidate, Donald Trump, to explain his grotesque and totally unacceptable past descriptions of women including ‪”fat pigs,” ”dogs‪,” ”slobs” and ‪”disgusting animals.” Ever the showman, Trump tried to duck responsibility at first with a snarky one-liner saying he was only talking about ‪Rosie O’Donnell – as if that would make it acceptable. When Megan Kelly pressed him on the fact that this simply wasn’t true, Trump - who never is accountable for his past comments or actions (a terrible leadership trait) - launched into an absurd diatribe about political correctness and then accused Kelly of not being nice to him and threatened to be "not nice" to her for simply asking him a direct question about something he didn’t want to talk about.

By Steve Adubato, PhD

In most cases, change can and should be a good thing if done at the right time, for the right reasons. Change keeps us on our toes and ready to turn obstacles into opportunities. However, leading BIG change is not for the faint of heart. Consider the following keys to leading and embracing change: