by Steve Adubato, PhD

Sometimes leadership comes down to doing what’s right, not only for yourself and those closest to you. Sometimes leadership comes down to doing what’s right, even if you think strategically it may have a negative impact on your personal or professional ambitions. Sometimes leadership comes down to simply stepping up for the larger good. Such is the case with Congressman Paul Ryan and the spectacle surrounding the vacancy to fill outgoing House Speaker John Boehner’s position. To be clear, the Speaker of the House is the second most powerful political post in the country. For the Republicans, it will be the most important political leadership position – bar none. But make no mistake; it is no easy job – far from it.

by Steve Adubato, PhD

Regardless of what we do professionally, the only way we can truly improve our performance and leadership is to receive and accept critical feedback without being defensive or argumentative. Exceptional leaders recognize this and are committed to providing constructive feedback to help their team members grow. The following tips and tools will help you give critical feedback even when it is hard for your team members to hear:

by Steve Adubato, PhD

“I think women all over this country heard very clearly what Mr. Trump said.” stated Carly Fiorina in Wednesday’s GOP Debate. More powerful words have never been spoken in a Presidential debate. Republican candidate Carly Fiorina eviscerated and publicly humiliated tough guy, Donald Trump, in front of the world with those words when asked to respond to Trump’s sophomoric and disgraceful comments about her face (which he said were misinterpreted because he said he was talking about her “persona”). There you have it, in my view as well as millions of others. Donald Trump was exposed for who and what he really is.

by Steve Adubato, PhD

Just when I thought Donald Trump couldn’t get any worse in his public speeches, he hit a new low in Rochester, NH (after bragging that he did so well in the CNN GOP Republican debate) in which he clearly did not step up and act like a leader. Trump’s first question from the audience came from a supporter who asked, “We have a problem in this country. It's called Muslims. You know our current President is one. You know he's not even an American… Anyway, we have training camps growing where they want to kill us. That's my question: When can we get rid of them?"

by Steve Adubato, PhD

Much of Hillary Clinton’s problem right now is a product of her own doing. If she were a stronger leader, with a greater sense of integrity and honesty, she would have dealt with this email controversy in a very different way. Instead of saying that storing thousands of emails on a private server – potentially, many sensitive emails – as Secretary of State was “allowed,” what she should have simply done from the beginning was say something like this; “I was wrong. It doesn’t matter what the law allows, what I did was inappropriate. I should have gone to the government email server given my role as Secretary of State. It created the wrong impression about my intent regarding those emails and I am fully responsible for that problem. I need to deal with this immediately by turning over those emails and fully cooperating with all of the agencies investigating this situation. It was a mistake and I need to do better in the future.”

by Steve Adubato, PhD

In any organization, the quality of meetings directly impacts productivity, effectiveness and employee engagement and happiness. Think about it. If your organization requires that you attend countless meetings that you find boring – and not especially relevant to you and your work – how engaged would you be? Yet, too often poorly run meetings become part of an organization’s normal course of business. I often hear, “It’s just the way we do things” as the explanation but I don’t buy it.

by Steve Adubato, PhD

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, I can’t figure out the Donald Trump thing. I can’t figure out his appeal to so many voters and I’m amazed that the masses haven’t figured out how full of it he really is. Not only isn’t he a legitimate leader – by any reasonable standard of defining what a leader is – he’s the king of insults. Donald Trump is like the Don Rickles of presidential politics. He insults just about everyone. Except Rickles is funny, Trump is just mean. As Peter Wehner, a senior White House advisor to George W. Bush, recently said, “He shouldn’t be let near a Twitter account, let alone nuclear weapons.”